The Hindrance Of The Stuck Half Shaft.

A while ago (read that as years ago) I was messing around on a sand track near Maitlands when I heard a bang. The awful sound of metal snapping is enough to send a chill down the hardest spine. I recently decided to take a look and see where the problem is.

I’m fairly certain that I snapped a half shaft. If I’m wrong it means that my actual differential is broken, and that would be terrible. If the diff is broken my fun is over. There is no way I can afford to replace a diff while saving up to go to Thailand. So I’d have to sell my Land Rover.
To check the half shaft for damage it has to be removed. This a really quick and easy task. In theory.
In theory you remove the hub cap and flange bolts without even jacking up or removing the wheel. Then just slide out the half shaft, flange and all.
This procedure worked a charm on the left hand side. The long shaft came away no problem. It’s in perfect working order though, so I need to check the short side shaft too.
Here’s my hindrance. The short side shaft is stuck.
I tried prising if off with a pry bar, but got nowhere.
My next step is to remove the locking nut and take off the flange. Then replace it backwards. Once in place, I have to drive three long bolts through the backwards flange, through a nut, and into the brake drum. Then while holding the bolt with a spanner, I need turn each of the three nuts evenly until the pressure pulls the flange away from the drum, and brings the shaft with it. Easy, right?
Well I toddled off to the hardware store to buy myself three long bolts to carry out my clever plan.
Except that we’re talking about a 1969 Series IIA vehicle. When it was made we were still using imperial bolts. I can only buy metric.
I got 10mm, but they are too big by a fraction of an inch. The next metric bolt down is an 8mm, which is too small.

New quest: Find imperial bolts that are 100mm long, and their matching nuts.

Until then, this is the sad state of my Land rover…

Wheel off

Leave a Reply